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LAW 35 HIT WICKET

1. Out Hit wicket

(a) The striker is out Hit wicket if, after the bowler has entered his delivery stride and while the ball is in play, his wicket is put down either by the striker’s bat or by his person as described in Law 28.1(a)(ii) and (iii) (Wicket put down).

Either

(i) in the course of any action taken by him in preparing to receive or in

receiving a delivery,or

(ii) in setting off for his first run immediately after playing or playing at the ball, or

(iii) if he makes no attempt to play the ball, in setting off for his first run,

providing that in the opinion of the umpire this is immediately after he has

had the opportunity of playing the ball, or

(iv) in lawfully making a second or further stroke for the purpose of guarding his

wicket within the provisions of Law 34.3 (Ball lawfully struck more than

once).

(b) If the striker puts his wicket down in any of the ways described in Law 28.1(a)(ii) and

(iii) (Wicket put down) before the bowler has entered his delivery stride, either umpire shall call and signal Dead ball.

2. Not out Hit wicket

Notwithstanding 1 above, the striker is not out under this Law should his wicket be put down in any of the ways referred to in 1 above if

(a) it occurs after he has completed any action in receiving the delivery, other than in

1(a)(ii), (iii) and (iv) above.

(b) it occurs when he is in the act of running, other than setting off immediately for his first run.

(c) it occurs when he is trying to avoid being run out or stumped.

(d) it occurs when he is trying to avoid a throw in at any time.

(e) the bowler after entering his delivery stride does not deliver the ball. In this case either umpire shall immediately call and signal Dead ball. See Law 23.3 (Umpire calling and signalling Dead ball).

(f) the delivery is a No ball.


LAW 36 LEG BEFORE WICKET

1. Out LBW

The striker is out LBW in the circumstances set out below.

(a) The bowler delivers a ball, not being a No ball

and (b) the ball, if it is not intercepted full pitch, pitches in line between wicket and wicket or on the off side of the striker’s wicket and (c) the ball not having previously touched his bat, the striker intercepts the ball, either full pitch or after pitching, with any part of his person and (d) the point of impact, even if above the level of the bails,

either

(i) is between wicket and wicket or

(ii) if the striker has made no genuine attempt to play the ball with his bat, is either between wicket and wicket or outside the line of the off stump.

and (e) but for the interception, the ball would have hit the wicket.

2. Interception of the ball

(a) In assessing points (c), (d) and (e) in 1 above, only the first interception is to be

considered.

(b) In assessing point (e) in 1 above, it is to be assumed that the path of the ball before

interception would have continued after interception, irrespective of whether the ball

might have pitched subsequently or not.

3. Off side of wicket

The off side of the striker’s wicket shall be determined by the striker’s stance at the moment the ball comes into play for that delivery. See Appendix D.


LAW 37 OBSTRUCTING THE FIELD

1. Out Obstructing the field

Either batsman is out Obstructing the field if he wilfully obstructs or distracts the fielding side by word or action.

Furthermore, it shall be regarded as obstruction if while the ball is in play either batsman wilfully, and without the consent of a fielder, strikes the ball with his bat or person, other than a hand not holding the bat, after the ball has been touched by a fielder. This shall apply whether or not there is any disadvantage to the fielding side. See 4 below.

2. Accidental obstruction.

It is for either umpire to decide whether any obstruction or distraction is wilful or not. He shall consult the other umpire if he has any doubt.

3. Obstructing a ball from being caught

The striker is out should wilful obstruction or distraction by either batsman prevent a catch being made.

This shall apply even though the striker causes the obstruction in lawfully guarding his wicket under the provisions of Law 34.3 (Ball lawfully struck more than once).

4. Returning the ball to a fielder

Either batsman is out Obstructing the field if, without the consent of a fielder and while the ball is in play, he uses his bat or person, other than a hand not holding the bat, to return the ball to any fielder.

5. Runs scored

If either batsman is dismissed Obstructing the field, runs completed by the batsmen before the offence shall be scored, together with any runs for penalties awarded to either side. See Laws 18.6 (Runs awarded for penalties) and 18.9 (Runs scored when a batsman is dismissed).

If, however the obstruction prevents a catch from being made, runs completed by the batsmen before the offence shall not be scored, but any runs for penalties awarded to either side shall stand.

6. Bowler does not get credit

The bowler does not get credit for the wicket.


LAW 38 RUN OUT

1. Out Run out

(a) Either batsman is out Run out, except as in 2 below, if, at any time while the ball is in play,

(i) he is out of his ground and

(ii) his wicket is fairly put down by the action of a fielder.

(b) (a) above shall apply even though No ball has been called and whether or not a run is being attempted, except in the circumstances of 2(e) below.

2. Batsman not Run out

Notwithstanding 1 above, a batman is not out Run out if

(a) he has been within his ground and has subsequently left it to avoid injury, when the wicket is put down.

Note also the provisions of Law 29.1(b) (When out of his ground)

(b) the ball has not subsequently been touched by a fielder, after the bowler has entered his delivery stride, before the wicket is put down.

(c) the ball, having been played by the striker, or having come off his person, directly strikes a protective helmet worn by a fielder and without further contact with him or any other fielder rebounds directly on to the wicket. However, the ball remains in play and either batsman may be Run out in the circumstances of 1 above if a wicket is subsequently put down.

(d) he is out Stumped. See Law 39.1(b) (Out Stumped).

(e) No ball has been called and

(i) he is out of his ground not attempting a run and

(ii) the wicket is fairly put down by the wicket-keeper without the intervention of

another fielder.

3. Which batsman is out

The batsman out in the circumstances of 1 above is the one whose ground is at the end where the wicket is put down. See Laws 2.8 (Transgression of the Laws by a batsman who has a runner) and 29.2 (Which is a batsman’s ground).

4. Runs scored.

If either batsman is dismissed Run out, the run in progress when the wicket is put down shall not be scored, but runs completed by the batsmen shall stand, together with any runs for penalties awarded to either side. See Laws 18.6 (Runs awarded for penalties) and 18.9 (Runs scored when a batsman is dismissed).

If, however, a striker who has a runner is himself dismissed Run out, runs completed by the runner and the other batsman before the wicket is put down shall not be scored, but any runs for penalties awarded to either side shall stand. See Law 2.8 (Transgression of the Laws by a batsman who has a runner).

5. Bowler does not get credit

The bowler does not get credit for the wicket.


LAW 39 STUMPED

1. Out Stumped

(a) The striker is out Stumped, except as in 3 below, if

(i) a ball which is not a No ball is delivered and

(ii) he is out of his ground, other than as in 3(a) below and

(iii) he has not attempted a run when

(iv) his wicket is fairly put down by the wicket-keeper without the intervention of

another fielder. Note, however Laws 2.8(c) (Transgression of the Laws by a

batsman who has a runner) and 40.3 (Position of wicket-keeper).

(b) The striker is out Stumped if all the conditions of (a) above are satisfied, even though a decision of Run out would be justified.

2. Ball rebounding from wicket-keeper’s person

(a) If the wicket is put down by the ball, it shall be regarded as having been put down by the wicket-keeper if the ball

(i) rebounds on to the stumps from any part of the wicket-keeper’s person or

equipment other than a protective helmet or

(ii) has been kicked or thrown on to the stumps by the wicket-keeper.

(b) If the ball touches a protective helmet worn by the wicket-keeper, the ball is still in play but the striker shall not be out Stumped. He will, however, be liable to be Run out in these circumstances if there is subsequent contact between the ball and any fielder. Note, however, 3 below.

3. Not out Stumped

(a) Notwithstanding 1 above, the striker will not be out Stumped if he has left his ground to avoid injury, when his wicket is put down.

(b) If the striker is not out Stumped he may, except in the circumstances of Law 38.2(e), be out Run out if the conditions of Law 38 (Run out) apply.


LAW 40 THE WICKET-KEEPER

1. Protective equipment

The wicket-keeper is the only fielder permitted to wear gloves and external leg guards. If he does so these are to be regarded as part of his person for the purposes of Law 41.2 (Fielding the ball). If by his actions and positioning it is apparent to the umpires that he will not be able to discharge his duties as a wicket-keeper, he shall forfeit this right and also the right to be recognised as a wicket-keeper for the purposes of Laws 32.3 (A fair catch), 39 (Stumped), 41.1 (Protective equipment ), 41.5 (Limitation of on-side fielders) and 41.6 (Fielders not to encroach on pitch).

2. Gloves

If, as permitted under 1 above, the wicket-keeper wears gloves, they shall have no webbing between the fingers except joining index finger and thumb, where webbing may be inserted as a means of support. If used, the webbing shall be

(a) a single piece of non-stretch material which, although it may have facing material

attached, shall have no reinforcements or tucks.

(b) such that the top edge of the webbing

(i) does not protrude beyond the straight line joining the top of the index finger to the

top of the thumb.

(ii) is taut when a hand wearing the glove has the thumb fully extended.

See Appendix C.

3. Position of wicket-keeper

The wicket-keeper shall remain wholly behind the wicket at the striker’s end from the

moment the ball comes into play until

(a) a ball delivered by the bowler either

(i) touches the bat or person of the striker or

(ii) passes the wicket at the striker’s end or

(b) the striker attempts a run.

In the event of the wicket-keeper contravening this Law, the striker’s end umpire shall call and signal No ball as soon as possible after the delivery of the ball.

4. Movement by wicket-keeper

It is unfair if the wicket-keeper standing back makes a significant movement towards the wicket after the ball comes into play and before it reaches the striker. In the event of such unfair movement by the wicket-keeper, either umpire shall call and signal Dead ball. It will not be considered a significant movement if the wicket-keeper moves a few paces forward for a slower delivery.

5. Restriction on actions of wicket-keeper

If, in the opinion of either umpire, the wicket-keeper interferes with the striker’s right to play the ball and to guard his wicket, Law 23.4(b)(vi) (Umpire calling and signalling Dead ball) shall apply.

If, however, either umpire considers that the interference by the wicket-keeper was wilful, then Law 42.4 (Deliberate attempt to distract striker) shall also apply.

6. Interference with wicket-keeper by striker

If, in playing at the ball or in the legitimate defence of his wicket, the striker interferes with the wicket-keeper, he shall not be out except as provided for in Law 37.3 (Obstructing a ball from being caught).


LAW 41 THE FIELDER

1. Protective equipment

No fielder other than the wicket-keeper shall be permitted to wear gloves or external leg guards. In addition, protection for the hand or fingers may be worn only with the consent of the umpires.

2. Fielding the ball

A fielder may field the ball with any part of his person, but if, while the ball is in play, he wilfully fields it otherwise,

(a) the ball shall immediately become dead and

(b) the umpire shall

(i) award 5 penalty runs to the batting side.

(ii) The penalty for a No ball or a Wide shall stand. Additionally, runs completed by the batsmen shall be credited to the batting side, together with the run in progress if the batsmen had already crossed at the instant of the offence.

(iii) inform the other umpire and the captain of the fielding side of the reason for this action.

(iv) inform the batsmen and, as soon as practicable, the captain of the batting side of what has occurred.

(c) The ball shall not count as one of the over.

(d) The umpires together shall report the occurrence as soon as possible after the match to the Executive of the fielding side and to any Governing Body responsible for the match, who shall take such action as is considered appropriate against the captain and the player or players concerned.

3. Protective helmets belonging to the fielding side

Protective helmets, when not in use by fielders, should, if above the surface, be placed only on the ground behind the wicket-keeper and in line with both sets of stumps. If a protective helmet belonging to the fielding side is on the ground within the field of play, and the ball while in play strikes it, the ball shall become dead, and 5 penalty runs shall then be awarded to the batting side, in addition to the penalty for a No ball or a Wide, if applicable.

Additionally runs completed by the batsmen before the ball strikes the protective helmet shall be scored, together with the run in progress if the batsmen had already crossed at the instant of the ball striking the protective helmet. See Law 18.10 (Runs scored when the ball becomes dead other than at the fall of a wicket)

4. Penalty runs not to be awarded

Notwithstanding 2 and 3 above, if from the delivery by the bowler, the ball first struck the person of the striker and, if in the opinion of the umpire, the striker

neither (i) attempted to play the ball with his bat nor (ii) tried to avoid being hit by the ball, then no award of 5 penalty runs shall be made and no other runs or penalties shall be credited to the batting side except the penalty for a No ball, if applicable. If runs are attempted, the umpire should follow the procedure laid down in Law 26.3 (Leg byes not to be awarded).

5. Limitation of on side fielders

At the instant of the bowler’s delivery there shall not be more than two fielders, other than the wicket-keeper, behind the popping crease on the on side. A fielder will be considered to be behind the popping crease unless the whole of his person whether grounded or in the air is in front of this line. In the event of infringement of this Law by any fielder, the striker’s end umpire shall call and signal No ball.

6. Fielders not to encroach on pitch

While the ball is in play and until the ball has made contact with the striker’s bat or person, or has passed the striker’s bat, no fielder, other than the bowler, may have any part of his person grounded on or extended over the pitch.

In the event of infringement of this Law by any fielder other than the wicket-keeper, the bowler’s end umpire shall call and signal No ball as soon as possible after delivery of the ball.

Note, however, Law 40.3 (Position of wicket-keeper).

7. Movement by fielders

Any significant movement by any fielder after the ball comes into play, and before the ball reaches the striker, is unfair. In the event of such unfair movement, either umpire shall call and signal Dead ball. Note also the provisions of Law 42.4 (Deliberate attempt to distract striker).

8. Definition of significant movement

(a) For close fielders anything other than minor adjustments to stance or position in relation to the striker is significant.

(b) In the outfield, fielders are permitted to move towards the striker or the striker’s wicket, provided that 5 above is not contravened. Anything other than slight movement off line or away from the striker is to be considered significant.

(c) For restrictions on movement by the wicket-keeper see Law 40.4 (Movement by wicketkeeper).