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LAW 27 APPEALS

1. Umpire not to give batsman out without an appeal

Neither umpire shall give a batsman out, even though he may be out under the Laws, unless appealed to by a fielder. This shall not debar a batsman who is out under any of the Laws from leaving his wicket without an appeal having been made. Note, however, the provisions of 7 below.

2. Batsman dismissed

A batsman is dismissed if either

(a) he is given out by an umpire, on appeal or

(b) he is out under any of the Laws and leaves his wicket as in 1 above.

3. Timing of appeals

For an appeal to be valid, it must be made before the bowler begins his run up or, if he has no run up, his bowling action to deliver the next ball, and before Time has been called.

The call of Over does not invalidate an appeal made prior to the start of the following over, provided Time has not been called. See Laws 16.2 (Call of Time) and 22.2 (Start of an over).

4. Appeal “How’s That?”

An appeal “How’s That?” covers all ways of being out.

5. Answering appeals

The striker’s end umpire shall answer all appeals arising out of any of Laws 35 (Hit wicket), 39 (Stumped) or 38 (Run out) when this occurs at the wicket-keeper’s end. The bowler’s end umpire shall answer all other appeals.

When an appeal is made, each umpire shall answer on any matter that falls within his

jurisdiction.

When a batsman has been given Not out, either umpire may answer an appeal, made in accordance with 3 above, if it is on a further matter and is within his jurisdiction.

6. Consultation by umpires

Each umpire shall answer appeals on matters within his own jurisdiction. If an umpire is doubtful about any point that the other umpire may had been in a better position to see, he shall consult the latter on this point of fact and shall then give the decision. If, after consultation, there is still doubt remaining, the decision shall be Not out.

7. Batsman leaving his wicket under a misapprehension

An umpire shall intervene if satisfied that a batsman, not having been given out, has left his wicket under a misapprehension that he is out. The umpire intervening shall call and signal Dead ball to prevent any further action by the fielding side and shall recall the batsman.

8. Withdrawal of an appeal

The captain of the fielding side may withdraw an appeal only if he obtains the consent of the umpire within whose jurisdiction the appeal falls. He must do so before the outgoing batsman has left the field of play. If such consent is given, the umpire concerned shall, if applicable, revoke his decision and recall the batsman.

9. Umpire’s decision

An umpire may alter his decision provided that such alteration is made promptly. This apart, an umpire’s decision, once made, is final.


LAW 28 THE WICKET IS DOWN

1. Wicket put down

(a) The wicket is put down if a bail is completely removed from the top of the stumps, or a stump is struck out of the ground,

(i) by the ball, or

(ii) by the striker’s bat if he is holding it or by any part of his bat that he is holding,or

(iii) notwithstanding the provisions of Law 6.8(a), by the striker’s bat in falling if he has let go of it, or by any part of his bat becoming detached, or

(iv) by the striker’s person or by any part of his clothing or equipment becoming

detached from his person,or

(v) by a fielder with his hand or arm, providing that the ball is held in the hand or hands so used, or in the hand of the arm so used.

The wicket is also put down if a fielder strikes or pulls a stump out of the ground in

the same manner.

(b) The disturbance of a bail, whether temporary or not, shall not constitute its complete removal from the top of the stumps, but if a bail in falling lodges between two of the

stumps this shall be regarded as complete removal.

2. One bail off

If one bail is off, it shall be sufficient for the purpose of putting the wicket down to remove the remaining bail or to strike or pull any of the three stumps out of the ground, in any of the ways stated in 1 above.

3. Remaking wicket

If a wicket is broken or put down while the ball is in play, it shall not be remade by an umpire until the ball is dead. See Law 23 (Dead ball). Any fielder may, however, while the ball is in play,

(i) replace a bail or bails on top of the stumps.

(ii) put back one or more stumps into the ground where the wicket originally stood.

4. Dispensing with bails

If the umpires have agreed to dispense with bails in accordance with Law 8.5 (Dispensing with bails), it is for the umpire concerned to decide whether or not the wicket has been put down.

(a) After a decision to play without bails, the wicket has been put down if the umpire

concerned is satisfied that the wicket has been struck by the ball, by the striker’s bat,

person or items of his clothing or equipment as described in 1(a) (ii), (iii) or (iv) above, or by a fielder in the manner described in 1(a)(v) above.

(b) If the wicket has already been broken or put down, (a) above shall apply to any stump or stumps still in the ground. Any fielder may replace a stump or stumps, in accordance with 3 above, in order to have an opportunity of putting the wicket down.


LAW 29 BATSMAN OUT OF HIS GROUND

1. When out of his ground

(a) A batsman shall be considered to be out of his ground unless his bat or some part of his person is grounded behind the popping crease at that end.

(b) Notwithstanding (a) above, if a running batsman, having grounded some part of his foot behind the popping crease, continues running further towards the wicket at that end and beyond, then any subsequent total loss of contact with the ground of both his person and his bat during his continuing forward momentum shall not be interpreted as being out of his ground.

2. Which is a batsman’s ground

(a) If only one batsman is within a ground

(i) it is his ground

(ii) it remains his ground even if he is later joined there by the other batsman.

(b) If both batsmen are in the same ground and one of them subsequently leaves it, (a)(i) above applies.

(c) If there is no batsman in either ground, then each ground belongs to whichever batsman is nearer to it, or, if the batsmen are level, to whichever batsman was nearer to it immediately prior to their drawing level.

(d) If a ground belongs to one batsman then, unless there is a striker who has a runner, the other ground belongs to the other batsman, irrespective of his position.

(e) When a batsman who has a runner is striker, his ground is always at the wicket-keeper’s end. However, (a), (b), (c) and (d) above will still apply, but only to the runner and the non-striker, so that that ground will also belong to either the non-striker or the runner, as the case may be.

3. Position of non-striker

The non-striker, when standing at the bowler’s end, should be positioned on the opposite side of the wicket to that from which the ball is being delivered, unless a request to do otherwise is granted by the umpire.


LAW 30 BOWLED

1. Out Bowled

(a) The striker is out Bowled if his wicket is put down by a ball delivered by the bowler, not being a No ball, even if it first touches his bat or person.

(b) Notwithstanding (a) above he shall not be out Bowled if before striking the wicket the ball has been in contact with any other player or an umpire. He will, however, be subject to Laws 33 (Handled the ball), 37 (Obstructing the field), 38 (Run out) and 39 (Stumped).

2. Bowled to take precedence

The striker is out Bowled if his wicket is put down as in 1 above, even though a decision against him for any other method of dismissal would be justified.


LAW 31 TIMED OUT

1. Out Timed out

(a) After the fall of a wicket or the retirement of a batsman, the incoming batsman must, unless Time has been called, be in position to take guard or for his partner to be ready to receive the next ball within 3 minutes of the dismissal or retirement. If this requirement is not met, the incoming batsman will be out, Timed out.

(b) In the event of protracted delay in which no batsman comes to the wicket, the umpires shall adopt the procedure of Law 21.3 (Umpires awarding a match). For the purposes of that Law the start of the action shall be taken as the expiry of the 3 minutes referred to above.

2. Bowler does not get credit

The bowler does not get credit for the wicket.


LAW 32 CAUGHT

1. Out Caught

The striker is out Caught if a ball delivered by the bowler, not being a No ball, touches his bat without having previously been in contact with any fielder, and is subsequently held by a fielder as a fair catch before it touches the ground.

2. Caught to take precedence

If the criteria of 1 above are met and the striker is not out Bowled, then he is out Caught, even though a decision against either batsman for another method of dismissal would be justified.

3. A fair catch

A catch shall be considered to have been fairly made if

(a) throughout the act of making the catch

(i) any fielder in contact with the ball is within the field of play. See 4 below.

(ii) the ball is at no time in contact with any object grounded beyond the boundary.

The act of making the catch shall start from the time when the ball in flight comes into contact with some part of a fielder’s person other than a protective helmet, and shall endwhen a fielder obtains complete control both over the ball and over his own movement.

(b) the ball is hugged to the body of the catcher or accidentally lodges in his clothing or, in the case of the wicket-keeper only, in his pads. However, it is not a fair catch if the ball lodges in a protective helmet worn by a fielder. See Law 23 (Dead ball).

(c) the ball does not touch the ground even though the hand holding it does so in effecting the catch.

(d) a fielder catches the ball after it has been lawfully struck more than once by the striker, but only if it has not been grounded since first being struck.

(e) a fielder catches the ball after it has touched an umpire, another fielder or the other

batsman. However, it is not a fair catch if the ball has previously touched a protective helmet worn by a fielder. The ball will then remain in play.

(f) a fielder catches the ball in the air after it has crossed the boundary provided that

(i) he has no part of his person touching or grounded beyond the boundary at any time

while he is contact with the ball.

(ii) the ball has not been grounded beyond the boundary. See Law 19.3 (Scoring a

boundary).

Note also Law 19.4 (Ball beyond the boundary)

(g) the ball is caught off an obstruction within the boundary provided the obstruction had not been designated a boundary by the umpires before the toss.

4. Fielder within the field of play

(a) A fielder is not within the field of play if he has any part of his person touching, or

grounded beyond, the boundary. See Law 19.3 (Scoring a boundary).

(b) 6 runs shall be scored if a fielder

(i) has any part of his person touching, or grounded beyond, the boundary when he

catches the ball.

(ii) catches the ball and subsequently touches the boundary or grounds some part of his person beyond the boundary while carrying the ball but before completing the catch.

See Laws 19.3 (Scoring a boundary) and 19.5 (Runs allowed for boundaries).

5. No runs to be scored

If the striker is dismissed Caught, runs from that delivery completed by the batsmen before the completion of the catch shall not be scored but any runs for penalties awarded to either side shall stand. Law 18.12 (Batsman returning to wicket he has left) shall apply from the instant of the completion of the catch.


LAW 33 HANDLED THE BALL

1. Out Handled the ball

(a) Either batsman is out Handled the ball if he wilfully touches the ball while in play with a hand or hands not holding the bat unless he does so with the consent of a fielder.

(b) Either batsman is out under this Law if, while the ball is in play, and without the consent of a fielder, he uses his hand or hands not holding the bat to return the ball to any fielder.

2. Not out Handled the ball

Notwithstanding 1(a) above, a batsman will not be out under this Law if he handles the ball to avoid injury.

3. Runs scored

If either batsman is dismissed Handled the ball, runs completed by the batsmen before the offence shall be scored, together with any runs for penalties awarded to either side. See Laws 18.6 (Runs awarded for penalties) and 18.9 (Runs scored when a batsman is dismissed).

4 Bowler does not get credit

The bowler does not get credit for the wicket.


LAW 34 HIT THE BALL TWICE

1. Out Hit the ball twice

(a) The striker is out Hit the ball twice if, while the ball is in play, it strikes any part of his person or is struck by his bat and, before the ball has been touched by a fielder, he

wilfully strikes it again with his bat or person, other than a hand not holding the bat,

except for the sole purpose of guarding his wicket. See 3 below and Laws 33 (Handled the ball) and 37 (Obstructing the field).

(b) For the purpose of this Law ‘struck’ or ‘strike’ shall include contact with the person of the striker.

2. Not out Hit the ball twice

Notwithstanding 1(a) above, the striker will not be out under this Law if

(i) he strikes the ball a second or subsequent time in order to return the ball to any fielder.

Note, however, the provisions of Law 37.4 (Returning the ball to a fielder).

(ii) he wilfully strikes the ball after it has touched a fielder. Note, however the provisions of Law 37.1 (Out Obstructing the field).

3. Ball lawfully struck more than once

Solely in order to guard his wicket and before the ball has been touched by a fielder, the striker may lawfully strike the ball a second or subsequent time with his bat, or with any part of his person other than a hand not holding the bat.

Notwithstanding this provision, he may not prevent the ball from being caught by striking the ball more than once in defence of his wicket. See Law 37.3 (Obstructing a ball from being caught).

4. Runs scored from ball lawfully struck more than once

When the ball is lawfully struck more than once, as permitted in 3 above, only the first strike is to be considered in determining whether runs are to be permitted and if so how they are to be recorded.

(a) If on the first strike, the umpire is satisfied that either

(i) the ball first struck the bat or

(ii) the striker attempted to play the ball with his bat or

(iii) the striker attempted to avoid being hit by the ball,

then the batting side shall be credited with any runs for penalties that may be applicable.

(b) Additionally, if the conditions in (a) above are met then, if they result from overthrows and only if they result from overthrows, runs completed by the batsmen or a boundary will be scored. They shall be credited to the striker if the first strike was with the bat. If the first strike was on the person of the striker they shall be recorded as Leg byes or No ball extras as appropriate. See Law 26.2 (Leg byes).

(c) If the conditions in (a) above are met and there is no overthrow until after the batsmen have started to run but before one run is completed,

(i) only subsequent completed runs or a boundary shall be scored. For the purposes of

this clause and (iii) below, the first run shall count as a completed run if and only if

the batsmen had not already crossed at the instant of the throw.

(ii) if in these circumstances the ball goes to the boundary from the throw then,

notwithstanding the provisions of Law 19.7 (Overthrow or wilful act of fielder),

only the boundary allowance shall be scored.

(iii) if the ball goes to the boundary as the result of a further overthrow, then runs

completed by the batsman after the first throw but before this final throw shall be

added to the boundary allowance. The run in progress at the first throw will count

as a completed run only if the batsmen had not already crossed at that instant. The

run in progress at the final throw shall count as a completed run only if the batsmen

had already crossed at that instant. Law 18.12 (Batsman returning to wicket he has

left) shall apply as from the instant of the final throw.

(d) If, in the opinion of the umpire, none of the conditions in (a) above are met then, whether there is an overthrow or not, the batting side shall not be credited with any runs from that delivery apart from the penalty for a No ball if applicable. Moreover, no other runs for penalties shall be awarded to the batting side.

5. Ball lawfully struck more than once – action by the umpire

If no runs are to be permitted, either in the circumstances of 4(d) above, or because there has been no overthrow, and

(a) if no run is attempted but the ball reaches the boundary, the umpire shall call and signal Dead ball and disallow the boundary.

(b) if the batsmen run and

(i) neither batsman is dismissed and the ball does not become dead for any other

reason, the umpire shall call and signal Dead ball as soon as one run is completed

or the ball reaches the boundary. The run or boundary shall be disallowed. The

batsmen shall return to their original ends.

or (ii) a batsman is dismissed, or if for any other reason the ball becomes dead before one run is completed or the ball reaches the boundary, all the provisions of the Laws

will apply except that the award of penalties to the batting side shall be as laid down

in 4(a) or 4(d) above, as appropriate.

6. Bowler does not get credit

The bowler does not get credit for the wicket.