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LAW 19 BOUNDARIES

1. The boundary of the field of play

(a) Before the toss the umpires shall agree the boundary of the field of play with both captains. The boundary shall if possible be marked along its whole length.

(b) The boundary shall be agreed so that no part of any sight-screen is within the field of play.

(c) An obstacle or person within the field of play shall not be regarded as a boundary unless so decided by the umpires before the toss. See Law 3.4 (To inform captains and scorers).

2. Defining the boundary – boundary marking

(a) Wherever practicable the boundary shall be marked by means of a white line or a rope along the ground.

(b) If the boundary is marked by means of a white line,

(i) the inside edge of the line shall be the boundary edge.

(ii) a flag, post or board used merely to highlight the position of a line marked on the ground must be placed outside the boundary edge and is not itself to be regarded as defining or marking the boundary. Note, however, the provisions of (c) below.

(c) If a solid object is used to mark the boundary, it must have an edge or a line to constitute the boundary edge.

(i) For a rope, which includes any similar object of curved cross section, lying on the ground, the boundary edge will be the line formed by the innermost points of the rope along its length.

(ii) For a fence, which includes any similar object in contact with the ground but with a flat surface projecting above the ground, the boundary edge will be the base line of the fence.

(d) If the boundary edge is not defined as in (b) or (c) above, the umpires and captains must agree before the toss what line will be the boundary edge. Where there is no physical marker for a section of boundary, the boundary edge shall be the imaginary straight line on the ground joining the two nearest marked points of the boundary edge.

(e) If a solid object used to mark the boundary is disturbed for any reason during play then, if possible, it shall be restored to its original position as soon as the ball is dead. If it is not possible then,

(i) if some part of the fence or other marker has come within the field of play, that part shall be removed from the field of play as soon as the ball becomes dead.

(ii) the line where the base of the fence or marker originally stood shall define the boundary edge.

3. Scoring a boundary

(a) A boundary shall be scored and signalled by the bowler’s end umpire whenever, while the ball is in play, in his opinion,

(i) the ball touches the boundary, or is grounded beyond the boundary.

(ii) a fielder with some part of his person in contact with the ball, touches the boundary or has some part of his person grounded beyond the boundary.

(b) The phrases ‘touches the boundary’ and ‘touching the boundary’ shall mean contact with either

(i) the boundary edge as defined in 2 above or

(ii) any person or obstacle within the field of play which has been designated a boundary by the umpires before the toss.

(c) The phrase ‘grounded beyond the boundary’ shall mean contact with

Either

(i) any part of a line or solid object marking the boundary except its boundary edge or (ii) the ground beyond the boundary edge or

(iii) any object in contact with the ground beyond the boundary edge.

4. Ball beyond the boundary

A ball may be caught, subject to the provisions of Law 32, or fielded after it has crossed the boundary, provided that

(i) the first contact with the ball is by a fielder either with some part of his person grounded within the boundary, or whose final contact with the ground before touching the ball was within the boundary.

(ii) neither the ball, nor any fielder in contact with the ball, touches or is grounded beyond, the boundary at any time during the act of making the catch or of fielding the ball. The act of making the catch, or of fielding the ball, shall start from the time when the ball first comes into contact with some part of a fielder’s person and shall end when a fielder obtains complete control both over the ball and over his own movement and has no part of his person touching or grounded beyond the boundary.

5. Runs allowed for boundaries

(a) Before the toss, the umpires shall agree with both captains the runs to be allowed for boundaries. In deciding the allowances, the umpires and captains shall be guided by the prevailing custom of the ground.

(b) Unless agreed differently under (a) above, the allowances for boundaries shall be 6 runs if the ball having been struck by the bat pitches beyond the boundary, but otherwise 4 runs. These allowances shall still apply even though the ball has previously touched a fielder. See also (c) below.

(c) The ball shall be regarded as pitching beyond the boundary and 6 runs shall be scored if a fielder

(i) has any part of his person touching the boundary or grounded beyond the boundary when he catches the ball.

(ii) catches the ball and subsequently touches the boundary or grounds some part of his person beyond the boundary while carrying the ball but before completing the catch. See Law 32 (Caught).

6. Runs scored

When a boundary is scored,

(a) any runs for penalties awarded to either side shall be scored.

(b) the batting side, except in the circumstances of 7 below, shall additionally be awarded whichever is the greater of

(i) the allowance for the boundary

(ii) the runs completed by the batsmen together with the run in progress if they had already crossed at the instant the boundary is scored.

(c) When the runs in (ii) above exceed the boundary allowance they shall replace the boundary for the purposes of Law 18.12 (Batsman returning to wicket he has left).

7 Overthrow or wilful act of fielder

If the boundary results from an overthrow or from the wilful act of a fielder the runs scored shall be

(i) any runs for penalties awarded to either side and

(ii) the allowance for the boundary and

(iii) the runs completed by the batsmen, together with the run in progress if they had already crossed at the instant of the throw or act. Law 18.12(b) (Batsman returning to wicket he has left) shall apply as from the instant of the throw or act.


LAW 20 LOST BALL

1. Fielder to call Lost ball

If a ball in play cannot be found or recovered, any fielder may call Lost ball. The ball shall then become dead. See Law 23.1 (Ball is dead). Law 18.12(b) (Batsman returning to wicket he has left) shall apply as from the instant of the call.

2. Ball to be replaced

The umpires shall replace the ball with one which has had wear comparable with that which the previous ball had received before it was lost or became irrecoverable. See Law 5.5 (Ball lost or becoming unfit for play).

3. Runs scored

(a) Any runs for penalties awarded to either side shall be scored.

(b) The batting side shall additionally be awarded either

(i) the runs completed by the batsmen, together with the run in progress if they had already crossed at the instant of the call or

(ii) 6 runs, whichever is the greater.

These shall be credited to the striker if the ball has been struck by the bat, but otherwise to the total of Byes, Leg byes, No balls or Wides as the case may be.


LAW 21 THE RESULT

1. A Win – two innings match

The side which has scored a total of runs in excess of that scored in the two completed innings of the opposing side shall win the match. See Law12.3 (Completed innings). Note also 6 below.

2. A Win – one innings match

The side which has scored in its one innings a total of runs in excess of that scored by the opposing side in its one completed innings shall win the match. See Law12.3 (Completed innings). Note also 6 below.

3. Umpires awarding a match

Notwithstanding any agreement under Law 12.1(b) (Number of innings),

(a) a match shall be lost by a side which either

(i) concedes defeat or

(ii) in the opinion of the umpires refuses to play and the umpires shall award the match to the other side.

(b) if an umpire considers that an action by any player or players might constitute a refusal by either side to play then the umpires together shall ascertain the cause of the action. If they then decide together that this action does constitute a refusal to play by one side, they shall so inform the captain of that side. If the captain persists in the action the umpires shall award the match in accordance with (a) above.

(c) if action as in (b) above takes place after play has started and does not constitute a refusal to play,

(i) playing time lost shall be counted from the start of the action until play recommences, subject to Law 15.5 (Changing agreed times for intervals).

(ii) the time for close of play on that day shall be extended by this length of time, subject to Law 3.9 (Suspension of play in dangerous or unreasonable conditions).

(iii) if applicable, no overs shall be deducted during the last hour of the match solely on account of this time.

4. Matches in which there is an agreement under Law 12.1(b)

For any match in which there is an agreement under Law 12.1(b) (Number of innings), if the result is not determined in any of the ways stated in 1, 2 or 3 above, then the result shall be as laid down in that agreement.

5. All other matches A Tie or Draw

(a) A Tie

The result of a match shall be a Tie when the scores are equal at the conclusion of play, but only if the side batting last has completed its innings.

(b) A Draw

A match which is concluded as defined Law 16.9 (Conclusion of match), without being determined in any of the ways stated in (a) above or in 1, 2, or 3, above, shall count as a Draw.

6. Winning hit or extras

(a) As soon as a result is reached as defined in 1, 2, 3, 4 or 5(a) above, the match is at an end. Nothing that happens thereafter, except as in Law 42.17(b) (Penalty runs), shall be regarded as part of it. Note also 9 below.

(b) The side batting last will have scored enough runs to win only if its total of runs is sufficient without including any runs completed by the batsmen before the completion of a catch, or the obstruction of a catch, from which the striker could be dismissed.

(c) If a boundary is scored before the batsmen have completed sufficient runs to win the match, the whole of the boundary allowance shall be credited to the side’s total and, in the case of a hit by the bat, to the striker’s score.

7. Statement of result

If the side batting last wins the match without losing all its wickets, the result shall be stated as a win by the number of wickets still then to fall.

If, without having scored a total of runs in excess of the total scored by the opposing side, the side batting last has lost all its wickets, but as the result of an award of 5 penalty runs its total of runs is then sufficient to win, the result shall be stated as a win to that side by Penalty runs.

If the side fielding last wins the match, the result shall be stated as a win by runs.

If the match is decided by one side conceding defeat or refusing to play, the result shall be stated as Match Conceded or Match Awarded, as the case may be.

8. Correctness of result

Any decision as to the correctness of the scores shall be the responsibility of the umpires. See Law 3.15 (Correctness of scores).

9. Mistakes in scoring

If, after the players and umpires have left the field in the belief that the match has been concluded, the umpires discover that a mistake in scoring has occurred which affects the result then, subject to 10 below, they shall adopt the following procedure.

(a) If, when the players leave the field, the side batting last has not completed its innings and either

(i) the number of overs to be bowled in the last hour, or in that innings, has not been completed or

(ii) the agreed time for close of play, or for the end of the innings, has not been reached then, unless one side concedes defeat, the umpires shall order play to resume.

Unless a result is reached sooner, play will then continue, if conditions permit, until the prescribed number of overs has been completed and either time for close of play has been reached or the allotted time for the innings has expired, as appropriate. The number of overs and time remaining shall be taken as they were at the call of Time for the supposed conclusion of the match. No account shall be taken of the time between that moment and the resumption of play.

(b) If, at this call of Time, the overs have been completed and no playing time remains, or if the side batting last has completed its innings, the umpires shall immediately inform both captains of the necessary corrections to the scores and to the result.

10. Result not to be changed

Once the umpires have agreed with the scorers the correctness of the scores at the conclusion of the match – see Laws 3.15 (Correctness of scores) and 4.2 (Correctness of scores) – the result cannot thereafter be changed.


LAW 22 THE OVER

1. Number of balls

The ball shall be bowled from each end alternately in overs of 6 balls.

2. Start of an over

An over has started when the bowler starts his run up or, if he has no run up, his action for the first delivery of that over.

3. Validity of balls

(a) A ball shall not count as one of the 6 balls of the over unless it is delivered, even though, as in Law 42.15 (Bowler attempting to run out non-striker before delivery) a batsman may be dismissed or some other incident occurs without the ball having been delivered.

(b) A ball delivered by the bowler shall not count as one of the 6 balls of the over

(i) if it is called dead, or is to be considered dead, before the striker has had an opportunity to play it. See Law 23.6 (Dead Ball; ball counting as one of over).

(ii) if it is called dead in the circumstances of Law 23.4(b)(vi) (Umpire calling and signalling Dead ball). Note also the special provisions of Law 23.4(b)(v).

(iii) if it is a No ball. See Law 24 (No ball).

(iv) if it is a Wide. See Law 25 (Wide ball)

(v) when 5 penalty runs are awarded to the batting side under any of Laws 2.6 (Player returning without permission), 41.2 (Fielding the ball), 42.4 (Deliberate attempt to distract striker), or 42.5 (Deliberate distraction or obstruction of batsman).

(c) Any deliveries other than those listed in (a) and (b) above shall be known as valid balls.

Only valid balls shall count towards the 6 balls of the over.

4. Call of Over

When 6 valid balls have been bowled and when the ball becomes dead, the umpire shall call Over before leaving the wicket. See also Law 23.3 (Call of Over or Time).

5. Umpire miscounting

(a) If the umpire miscounts the number of valid balls, the over as counted by the umpire shallstand.

(b) If, having miscounted, the umpire allows an over to continue after 6 valid balls have been bowled, he may subsequently call Over as the ball becomes dead after any delivery, even if that delivery is not a valid ball.

6. Bowler changing ends

A bowler shall be allowed to change ends as often as desired, provided he does not bowl two overs consecutively, nor bowl parts of each of two consecutive overs, in the same innings.

7 Finishing an over

(a) Other than at the end of an innings, a bowler shall finish an over in progress unless he is incapacitated or is suspended under any of the Laws.

(b) If for any reason, other than the end of an innings, an over is left uncompleted at the start of an interval or interruption, it shall be completed on resumption of play.

8. Bowler incapacitated or suspended during an over

If for any reason a bowler is incapacitated while running up to deliver the first ball of an over, or is incapacitated or suspended during an over, the umpire shall call and signal Dead ball.

Another bowler shall complete the over from the same end, provided that he does not bowl two overs consecutively, nor bowl parts of each of two consecutive overs, in that innings.